Britannica.com Travel And Tourism

Geography & Travel Portal Britannica

Details: Geography & Travel. Planet Earth contains some extraordinarily diverse environments, some of which are easily habitable and some not so much. In different areas of Earth, one might find sweltering deserts, dense tropical rainforests, or bone-chilling tundras. Each biome and habitat comes with its own selection of flora and fauna, and it may

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Travel literature Britannica

Details: Other articles where Travel literature is discussed: nonfictional prose: Travel and epistolary literature: The literature of travel has declined in quality in the age when travel has become most common—the present. In this nonfictional prose form, the traveller himself has always counted for more than the places he visited, and in the past, he…

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tourism Definition, History, Types, Importance

Details: Rail travel also made grand tour destinations more widely accessible, reinforcing existing tourism flows while contributing to tensions and clashes between classes and cultures among the tourists. By the late 19th century, steam navigation and railways were opening tourist destinations from Lapland to New Zealand , and the latter opened the

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Trivia Quizzes: Geography & Travel Britannica

Details: A Capital Idea. U.S. State Nicknames Quiz. 47 Questions from Britannica’s Most Popular Geography Quizzes. 39 of the Most Challenging World Capitals Across History. World Explorers Quiz. Quick Quiz: This Land Is Your Land. Quick Quiz: Know Your Waterfalls. Explore England, Scotland, and Wales Quiz.

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Travel and Navigation Quiz Britannica

Details: Travel beyond interstate highways and high-speed trains, and navigate the questions in this quiz. You may be familiar with voice-activated GPS gadgets, but what about a half-hitch? An altimeter? Travel beyond interstate highways and high-speed trains, and navigate the questions in this quiz.

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the Green Book History, Facts, & African American Travel

Details: The Green Book, travel guide published (1936–67) during the segregation era in the U.S. that identified businesses that would accept Black customers. Compiled by Victor Hugo Green, a Black postman, it helped make travel comfortable and safe for African Americans in the …

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space tourism Companies, History, & Facts Britannica

Details: Space tourism, recreational space travel, either on established government-owned vehicles such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS) or on vehicles fielded by private companies. Since the flight of the world’s first space tourist, American businessman Dennis Tito, on April 28, 2001, space tourism has gained new prominence as more suborbital and orbital tourism

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Blackfoot people Britannica

Details: Blackfoot, North American Indian tribe composed of three closely related bands, the Piegan (officially spelled Peigan in Canada), or Piikuni; the Blood, or Kainah (also spelled Kainai, or Akainiwa); and the Siksika, or Blackfoot proper (often referred to as the Northern Blackfoot). The three groups

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Wagon train North American history Britannica

Details: Wagon train, caravan of wagons organized by settlers in the United States for emigration to the West during the late 18th and most of the 19th centuries. Composed of up to 100 Conestoga wagons (q.v.; sometimes called prairie schooners), wagon trains soon became the prevailing mode of long-distance

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woodpecker Characteristics, Species, & Facts Britannica

Details: Most are not social, tending rather to be solitary or to travel in pairs. The acorn woodpecker (M. formicivorus) is about 20 cm (8 inches) long and is found from the deciduous woodlands of western North America south to Colombia. It depends on acorns for winter food, storing a …

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Will Light-Speed Space Travel Ever Be Possible

Details: So, light-speed travel and faster-than-light travel are physical impossibilities, especially for anything with mass, such as spacecraft and humans. Even for very tiny things, like subatomic particles, the amount of energy ( E ) needed to near the speed of light poses a significant challenge to the feasibility of almost light-speed space travel.

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Gulliver’s Travels Summary, Assessment, & Facts Britannica

Details: Gulliver’s Travels, four-part satirical work by Anglo-Irish author Jonathan Swift, published anonymously in 1726. One of the keystones of English literature, it was a parody of the travel narrative, an adventure story, and a savage satire, mocking English customs and the politics of the day.

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caravel Definition, Significance, & Facts Britannica

Details: Caravel, a light sailing ship of the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries in Europe, much-used by the Spanish and Portuguese for long voyages. Apparently developed by the Portuguese for exploring the coast of Africa, the caravel’s chief excellence lay in its capacity for sailing to windward.

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10 Places to Visit in the Solar System Britannica

Details: Olympus Mons is the largest volcano in the solar system. It is 700 km (435 miles across and rises 22 km (14 miles) above the surrounding Tharsis plain. The edge of Olympus Mons is a cliff 10 km (6 miles) high. From there it is a shallow slope to the central craters, which are 85 km (53 miles) across.

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Guidebook travel Britannica

Details: Travel guidebooks became available to the emigrants shortly after use of the trail became widespread. One of the earliest and most popular of these was Landsford Hastings’s The Emigrant’s Guide to Oregon and California (1845). For Mormons, there was The Latter-day… Read More

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Ibn Battuta Biography, History, Travels, & Map Britannica

Details: Ibn Battuta, medieval Muslim traveler and author of one of the most famous travel books, the Rihlah. His great work describes the people, places, and cultures he encountered in his journeys along some 75,000 miles (120,000 km) across and beyond the Islamic world.

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Travelgate United States history Britannica

Details: Other articles where Travelgate is discussed: Hillary Clinton: First lady of the United States: …White House travel office (“Travelgate”) and her involvement in legal maneuvering by the White House during the Whitewater investigation. As the 1996 election approached, she was less visible and played a more traditional role as first lady.

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maglev Facts, Operation, & Systems Britannica

Details: At present maglev technology has produced trains that can travel in excess of 500 km (310 miles) per hour. This speed is twice as fast as a conventional commuter train and comparable to the TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse) in use in France, which travels between 300 and 320 km (186 and 199 miles) per hour. Because of air resistance, however

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Mass transit Britannica

Details: Mass transit, the movement of people within urban areas using group travel technologies such as buses and trains. The essential feature of mass transportation is that many people are carried in the same vehicle (e.g., buses) or collection of attached vehicles (trains). This makes it possible to

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Marco Polo Biography, Accomplishments, Facts, Travels

Details: Marco Polo, Venetian merchant and adventurer who traveled from Europe to Asia in 1271–95, remaining in China for 17 of those years. His account of those travels, known in English as the Travels of Marco Polo, is a classic. The wealth of new geographic information recorded by Polo was widely used by European navigators.

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Aircraft and Air Travel Quiz Britannica

Details: Air has to travel further to get over the top and thus is more spread out. The "thicker" air below "pushes" up. Question: Airplanes can make clouds. Answer: Contrails are long, thin clouds sometimes observed behind an airplane flying in clear, cold, humid air. It is condensation of the water vapor produced by the combustion of fuel in the

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Xuanzang Biography & Facts Britannica

Details: Xuanzang, Buddhist monk and Chinese pilgrim to India who translated the sacred scriptures of Buddhism from Sanskrit into Chinese and founded in China the Buddhist Consciousness Only school. His fame rests mainly on the volume and diversity of his translations of the Buddhist sutras and on the record of his travels.

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Oregon Trail traveled from Missouri to Oregon Britannica

Details: Heavy rains created mud that slowed travel and flooded rivers. People also had to time their journey to make it through the western mountain ranges before the onset of heavy snows in autumn. The journey west was difficult and sometimes deadly. About 10 percent of …

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Prairie schooner wagon Britannica

Details: Prairie schooner, 19th-century covered wagon popularly used by emigrants traveling to the American West. In particular, it was the vehicle of choice on the Oregon Trail. The name prairie schooner was derived from the wagon’s white canvas cover, or bonnet, which gave it the appearance, from a

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Apache History, Facts, & Trad Britannica

Details: Apache, North American Indians who, under such leaders as Cochise, Mangas Coloradas, Geronimo, and Victorio, figured largely in the history of the Southwest during the latter half of the 19th century. Their name is probably derived from a Spanish transliteration of apachu, the term for ‘enemy’ in Zuni.

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Primary wave seismology Britannica

Details: P and S waves travel through the planet Earth after an earthquake. Scientists studying the waves produced by earthquakes learned that Earth's core has separate liquid and solid layers. S waves do not travel through liquid, but P waves do. A simplified diagram shows the S waves on the left and the P waves on the right, but waves of both types would actually radiate in all directions.

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Eugene Fodor American writer Britannica

Details: Eugene Fodor, Hungarian-born American travel writer who created a series of popular tourist guidebooks that provided entertaining reading, historical background, and cultural insights into the people and places described, as well as reliable, practical information designed to assist even the most

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Oder River river, Europe Britannica

Details: Oder River, river of east-central Europe. It is one of the most significant rivers in the catchment basin of the Baltic Sea, second only to the Vistula in discharge and length. For the first 70 miles (112 kilometres) from its source, it passes through the Czech Republic. For a distance of 116 miles

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7 Accidents and Disasters in Spaceflight History Britannica

Details: The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975 was a feat of both space travel and politics: it was the first joint U.S. and Soviet spaceflight and marked the end of the space race between the two countries. Bottle up all of the tension between these two superpowers, and there’s bound to be some mishap.

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John Milton Biography, Poems, Paradise Lost, Quotes

Details: Travel abroad. In 1638, accompanied by a manservant, Milton undertook a tour of the Continent for about 15 months, most of which he spent in Italy, primarily Rome and Florence. The Florentine academies especially appealed to Milton, and he befriended young members of the Italian literati, whose similar humanistic interests he found gratifying

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Have Gun-Will Travel American television program

Details: Other articles where Have Gun-Will Travel is discussed: Richard Boone: …in the classic television western Have Gun—Will Travel. Garbed in black and armed with a Colt .45 revolver, Paladin sells his services to those who are unable to protect themselves. The show was a huge hit, and Boone also directed a number of episodes.

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The Travel Diary of a Philosopher work by Keyserling

Details: Other articles where The Travel Diary of a Philosopher is discussed: Hermann Alexander, Graf von Keyserling: …Das Reisetagebuch eines Philosophen (1919; The Travel Diary of a Philosopher). Keyserling’s approach to philosophy was essentially nonacademic, and his ideas, which centred on the theme of spiritual regeneration, were often platitudinous or obscure.

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Travancore historical state, India Britannica

Details: Travancore, former princely state in southwestern India, now part of Kerala state. Travancore was in the kingdom of Kerala, or Chera, in the early centuries ce and traded with distant parts of the world. In the 11th century the region fell under the Chola empire. The Hindu kings of the Vijayanagar

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Are the Middle East and the Near East the Same Thing

Details: So, for all intents and purposes, Middle East and Near East refer to the same region when used today. This hasn’t always been the case. The term Near East was coined in the 19th century when Westerners divided the “Orient” into three parts: the Near East, the Middle East, and the Far East. The Near East included the Ottoman Empire and the

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Galileo Biography, Discoveries, Inventions, & Facts

Details: Galileo, Italian natural philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician who made fundamental contributions to the sciences of motion, astronomy, strength of materials, and to the scientific method. His discoveries with the telescope revolutionized astronomy, and his observations bolstered Copernican theory.

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Post chaise carriage Britannica

Details: Post chaise, four-wheeled, closed carriage, containing one seat for two or three passengers, that was popular in 18th-century England.The body was of the coupé type, appearing as if the front had been cut away. Because the driver rode one of the horses, it was possible to have windows in front as well as at the sides. At the post chaise’s front end, in place of the coach box, was a luggage

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Sarah Kemble Knight American diarist Britannica

Details: Sarah Kemble Knight, American colonial teacher and businesswoman whose vivid and often humorous travel diary is considered one of the most authentic chronicles of 18th-century colonial life in America. Sarah Kemble was the daughter of a merchant. Sometime before 1689 she married Richard Knight, of

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Suez Canal History, Map, Importance, Length, Depth

Details: Suez Canal, sea-level waterway running north-south across the Isthmus of Suez in Egypt to connect the Mediterranean and Red seas. It separates the African continent from Asia, and it provides the shortest maritime route between Europe and the lands lying around the Indian and western Pacific oceans.

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Phileas Fogg fictional character Britannica

Details: Phileas Fogg, fictional character, a wealthy, eccentric Englishman who wagers that he can travel around the world in 80 days in Jules Verne ’s novel Around the World in Eighty Days (1873). This article was most recently revised and updated by Kathleen Kuiper, Senior Editor.

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John Davis English navigator Britannica

Details: John Davis, Davis also spelled Davys, (born c. 1550, Sandridge, near Dartmouth, Devon, Eng.—died Dec. 29/30, 1605, off Bintan Island, near Singapore), English navigator who attempted to find the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic to the Pacific.. Davis appears to have first proposed his plan to look for the Northwest Passage in 1583 to Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary

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